Skip to main content

About your Search

20130615
20130623
SHOW
Book TV 18
Cavuto 9
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 49
CSPAN2 34
CSPAN 28
CNNW 27
SFGTV2 25
FBC 17
CURRENT 10
KQED (PBS) 10
MSNBC 10
SFGTV 8
KNTV (NBC) 7
KPIX (CBS) 7
KQEH (PBS) 6
KTVU (FOX) 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 338
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 339 (some duplicates have been removed)
's distorted tea party comparison. >> this is a civil rights movement. it's time for us to start moving as a civil rights movement. we have to be willing to have the dogs be unleashed on us. >> i'll have a response ahead. >>> 50 years after the march on washington, the tea party has found a new successor to the civil rights movement, itself, the tea party. here is glenn beck making the big announcement yesterday. >> this is a civil rights movement. and it's time for us to start moving as a civil rights movement. we have to be willing to have the dogs be unleashed on us, because believe me, after what i saw today on the way they're handling things at the capitol, you're not very far from having the same kind of oppression coming our way. >> it's unbelievable. he is talking about imaginary unleashed dogs, when real heroes of the civil rights movement actually had to confront those dangers. yesterday, beck made his case at a rally in washington. but even as he talked about civil rights, the slogans on the signs told the story of fear and paranoia. it was similar to what we saw at previous
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil right
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
>>> this morning my question, when is it right to defend evil. plus republicans embracing civil rights as a branding strategy. and a fresh look at city dads on this father's day. first, our civil rights in danger at the supreme court next weekend and we have a nerdland panel to break down the struggle. good morning. i'm ari melber sitting in this weekend for melissa harris-perry. in modern america we have a story we tell ourselves about civil rights. it's about protest movements pushing the courts and courts pushing politicians even as they resisted to defend the status quo. today we want to explore a slightly different take on the story. this is a story where they are turning against social movements and a mantle of a color-blind society. it's a story where idealism of evers has been come opted by political gain by the same people seeking to strike down civil rights laws. starting monday the supreme court begins the end of this term. it will rule on two core terms of civil rights law, voting power and equal opportunity. understand why the court may be on the verge of unraveling
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
. the defense has been tried in court. is a civil rights statute. -- it is a civil rights statute. they can be a perfectly legitimate plaintiffs to bring a lawsuit, and there are a number of people who belong to disability organizations that actually, that is what their livelihood is, bringing these lawsuits. the gentleman over here, who was also a lawyer knows of at least one case involving two lawsuits. they started all neighborhoods. the target places like san francisco because this is an old city with old buildings, virtually none of which comply. we only have new construction that would be billed to 1988 compliance standards, usually. whatever kind of business you have, the building part does not enforce ada compliance. you have your architect look at the ada if you are going to make a major revision anyway. is very expensive to do that. the demand letter is a requirment for the state -- is a requirement for the state laws to be brought. for civil rights cases, you are expected to know the law and be in compliance. they do not make a demand under federal law saying they should ask you
for syllable rights. -- civil rights. after his body was laid to rest in 1895, the people of rochester erected the first monument honoring him in 1899. the people of washington dc have also undertook this great man who called their city home at the latter years of his life. i want to thank the people of washington for generously donating this culture which will be seen by millions of visitors every year. it is not an accident that his statue stands here next to the marker dedicated to the enslaved laborers who built the capital that completed the capital dome during the civil war. these workers were among the millions of slaves who frederick douglass, a former slave himself, dedicated his life to free. the statue of frederick douglass joins elite three other sculptures of african-americans in the u.s. capital. martin luther king jr., rosa parks, sojourner truth. for too long, the cap the collection of statues failed to include courageous africans americans who led some the most important movement and the nations and world history. the installation of this statue in a place named emancipation h
in the civil rights movement. 50 years ago reverend martin luther king jr. unveiled his i have a dream speech. also on this day the murders of three civil rights workers in the case that shocked the nation and came to be known as mississippi burning. i'll talk about it all with my special guest martin luther king iii. we start with tonight's leap. major developments in the george zimmerman second-degree murder trial. from the very last day in court before opening arguments. today the judge made an important ruling on what prosecutors are allowed to say in their opening statement. prosecutors can say the phrases profiled, vigilante, wannabe cop and they can say mr. zimmerman confronted trayvon martin. the defense hoped to block all those words from being used by the prosecution. we're still waiting for a ruling on what could be the key evidence in this trial. the state's expert analysis of a 911 call made by witness the night that trayvon martin was killed. >> i think they're yelling help but i don't know. >> does he look hurt to you? >> i can't see him. i don't want to go out there. i don't k
educator and civil rights activists. and my book is about her educational activism, both prior to and during and after the civil rights movement. i was interested in telling her story because she was a very important person in the civil rights movement. but she was also important before that. she was nearly sixty years old by the time she did what she's most well known for, which the citizenship education program. citizenship schools. so as i got in to researching this book, i was like, what did she do from twenty to sixty? what did she do that prepared her to do this? what does it tell us about the deeper root of the movement and women's roles in it? and then her schools were sites primary sites of women's activism during the movement too. looking at this one figure the way to tell a longer story about the civil rights movement, but also about black women's activism across the 20th century. so she was born in charles stone in 1998, her father was a slave, and her mother was a free woman who had been raised in haiti part of the time, also born in charleston. she started her tea
and civil rights activist. and my book is about her educational activism both prior to and during and after the civil rights movement. i am interested in telling her story because she was a very important person in the civil rights movement but also important before that. she was nearly 60 years old at the time she did what she was most well-known for this is an education program, a citizenship school such as i got into researching this book i thought what did she do between 20 and 60 that prepared her to do do this and to tell us of the deeper roots of the myth and the women's role and her schools for primary sites of women activism during the movement. looking at the one figure was a way to tell a longer story of the civil-rights movement also black women's activism over the 20th century. born in charleston 8098, her father was a slave. her white woman was every mother born in charleston raised in haiti and she started her teaching career 1916 on john's island. she continued her career and urban schools in south carolina and all of her teaching career in south carolina then in 1956 the st
it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
francisco as a criminal prosecutor and a civil- rights attorney and really got to understand how much of a beacon to the rest of the world san francisco is for social justice. i also been spent a number of years helping to grow a small business, got to understand the innovative spirit here in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood association leader and also as the chair of an affordable housing organization and learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and facing a really special tools that are the urban villages that we live in. sen for assistance -- facing really the special jules -- jewels that are the urban villages that we live in. san franciscans during campaigns read everything they are sent in the mail. love to meet candidates. a gauge with them in conversations. i also learned how important it is to build bridges between communities, particularly communities of diversity we have. i was just incredibly honored to have been elected in november 2008. my district really encompasses the ethnic and economic diversity that exists throughout the
'm joined by michelle bernard, author of "moving america toward justice lawyers' committee of civil rights" which comes out on wednesday. and president of bernard center for women. rick perlstein contributor to "nation" magazine, and george and roberto lovato, co-founder of presente.org, latino political organization. thanks for joining us. i guess we'll start with this basic dilemma that democrats are facing that spilled into public view this week in the senate where, you know, it's 60 votes -- you need 60 votes to beat a filibuster and to get this bill out of the senate but the lodger chuck schumer is talking about, well f 60 votes get it out of the senate but if you want any chance in the house these days you need 70-plus so overwhelming majority so isolates house republicans, they feel pressured to bring the bill to vote in the house, even if most won't vote for it. george, you're down there, what's you're read on the mood in the senate? how do you rank and file fall on that question? >> the rank and file of not only the senate but in the house are skeptical of this approach by chuck s
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
citizens closed their eyes to the civil rights violations of other americans. there was only about ten to 20% of those that fought in the american revolution only about ten or 20% of the entire population of america was involved. the rest stood out and watched to see what happened. people all in history have said things like well, i am okay. i just don't want to think about that. or i'm busy. or it doesn't personally affect me. or it can't be as bad as they say. or even if it is, i am just one person. and what difference can i make? nothing has changed except for the chairs of the table. someone is always on the losing end of the stick of power. blacks are the most obvious. the chinese, the native american. but let's not forget the irish with the catholics or the mormons were the jews. now it seems those on the short end of the stick are those of faith that will not conform. [applause] for those that think men foolishly make progress collectively, let me warn you, history teaches that you couldn't be more wrong. we are redeemed one man at a time. there is no family ticket or path to li
, with the very strong civil rights background and also a strong background of working with tenants through the housing rights committee. so we want to welcome mike and very happy mike is now on our team. it's my pleasure to welcome our new internal, iman, who will be helping people with speaker cards and whatever assistance they need. iman started this wednesday and will be a senior in high school come this fall. we have already been very impressed with her professionalism and we're just delighted to have her youthful perspective in the office. my first topic for my report is an update. you will recall at our last meeting that we heard from the accessible parking advisory committee, where we shared some of our recommendations about parking placard reform, which is what we heard our previous speaker mentioning. since our last mdc meet something of us on the committee have continued to derive some informational hearings and materials, informational briefings i should say, to policymakers like the board of supervisors. and last week, some of us traveled to sacramento, where we spoke to the le
. catch the voter not changed a bit about for civil rights which opened up all the stuff that john lewis spot for all this was done by a vote of 73-27. the republican vote was 27-6. what do you think it would be today? a dramatic change. i know one thing in this last election. what was the most popular picture in the newspapers in the last election and? was at the debates? was at the convention's? know, was the picture the republican governor of new jersey walking along the beach with the democratic president of the united states. that is what people want and that is what the people in this country are dying for. [applause] and i have like you a bookseller i have a lifesaver coming up this november. "tip and the gipper" about the working relationship of a conservative president ronald reagan at a very liberal speaker of the house tip o'neill. it's not despite all the talk you hear about a cartoon about two old irish guy sipping whiskey together. the last thing we need is an ethnic -- etc. story of two professionals who knew their job was to do a job not to screw the country up with gover
. we were sitting around one day watching tv. certainly i was not in the civil rights at all. at the university of california berkeley, a liberal bastion, there was less than 1% of the student population and there was none on the baseball team we were sitting in the tv room and we are showing pictures of birmingham, alabama. the horror that was going on there in birmingham. he attacked the nonviolent demonstrators there and some people said that this was just not right. so it stuck with me. the next semester, i took a class and the only thing that we had to do is write a term paper. i wrote a paper that was 60 pages long and i did it on the student nonviolent coordinating committee. i really got into the whole solar rights committee. i have turned it in fully expecting to get an a grade. i got a b on the paper. the next semester i got a different professor about a week or two later. she was the santa barbara blonde, her name was on it. how would you feel about giving me your paper and i thought, this is my chance. [laughter] the professor had written this. so i just read type
the trip? >> right. you're absolutely correct that civil libertarians are clever even in germany. exactly. this is a key issue for germans. i think if there was any place where he had to say something about the nsa surveillance program in europe, this was the place to do it. it was reported that he talked to angela merkel about it as well. what's really going to matter is what happens at home when he comes back tonight and over the next several days when he leaves for africa and what congress is going to say if there are going to be anymore questions that folks really want to bring to the president especially jay carney at the podium about this program. >> protests aside, isn't berlin germany probably one of the more friendly places for the president to have this conversation and to deal with the issue of nsa? >> yes. i would say compared to a lot of countries in the world, absolutely. compared to the rest of europe, yeah. i would say probably better than a couple other countries. most importantly is the president's friendship with angela merkel. this has developed over the course of his
is the viewers' guide to what's at stake. voting rights. one of the most significant pieces of civil rights legislation in our nation's history and which still connects in practical term to this very day to persistent state by state effort to suppress the vote. key part of the voting rights act, section 5, the part with real teeth could be struck down. affirmative action. will public universities to be able to use race as a factor at all in admissions? to achieve equal access to some of our country's most vital public resources, state universities. it is in serious risk of being fully invalidated by the supreme court. same-sex marriage. 12 states and district of columbia recognize same-sex marriage. if doma is upheld by the supreme court, all those legal marriages in all those states will continue to get a giant go to hell from the federal government denying scores of legal benefits to the couples. the court will decide the constitutionality of california's proposition 8 in which voters of that 8 decided by referendum to take away marriage equality from fellow californians who had been gran
, we would see all of america rise. >> glenn beck compared this conservative right to the civil rights movement. congressman, what is your response to that? >> that is -- not only -- it is almost harassy for him to make that comparison. in fact, it is. the civil rights movement is about fulfilling people's rights. to make the values of the nation real for all-americans, regardless and comprehensive reform. and it is about extending values to 11 million people here, working and that's the rereality and to immigrate them into the great society of ours. simple as that. but to by a car the fight against emigration reform to the civil rights movement is hair assy and sis service to the sacrificers that many, many made it make sure all rights for all people. >> is speaker boehner going to be able to hold his caucus together and get something done on this? that's a big question and i just don't have confidence that there is legislation coming forth from the conservatives in the house that is going to give confidence to 11 million undocumented workers to step forward, come out of the shadows a
, the country fought a civil war, we had a civil rights movement, the '64 voting rights civil rights act. carol? >> i would like to say that for me, i've been a democrat most of my life and i made the switch maybe about ten years ago. it was not easy to become a republican. i went democrat, independent and eventually republican. and i don't see how anyone that calls themselves a christian could actually belong to the democratic party. >> why do you say that? >> because it's the party of abortion. and if you look at the impact on african-americans, if republicans were doing to blacks what democrats are doing, it would be called genocide. >> wow. ron kristy? >> the think we said at the top of the segment that upsets me the most is that the white house use race as a means to stop conversation. if you say that someone is a racist or they play the race card, the policies have failed americans in general to fail the black community in particular. what they are doing for the lack of school choice is killing our kids. what they are doing with gun violence in our inner cities is killing black kids, but
to protest her brother's jail term. she is urging the chinese president to respect civil rights. her husband is also serving an 11 year prison term after he called for democratic reform. .epresentatives of europe have called for greek media signals to be restored immediately. >> the best way to show -- >> day four of the blackout. the message was delivered in person by the head of the european broadcasting union. >> we are in a unique situation in europe. publicot have any broadcasts on-air. the situation has to be reversed immediately. as soon as possible. >> the coalition government is now embroiled in its own problem. they disagree with the decision to pull the plug on state television. the crisis has spread beyond the private sector. after three days without revenues, they are beginning to feel the pain. >> we have to fight unemployment. 2600 layoffs in greek public television, it is something nobody wanted. evenso have one million more unemployed in the private sector. nobody shed a tear for them. >> it is the political problems that have to be resolved. before the government goes head
was a social activist, civil rights activist in my book is about her educational act of his son, both prior to entering after the civil rights movement. i was interested in telling her story because she was a very person in the civil rights movement, but she was before that. she was nearly 60 years old at the time she did what she is most for, which is citizenship schools. i was like what does she do from 20 to 60 that prepared her to do this, does this tell us about the deeper reset the movement and women's roles and it? and then her schools where primary sites of women's activism during the movement. look at this one figure was a way to tell a longer story, but also black women's activism across the 20th century. so to not clerk was born in charleston in 1898. her father was a slave and her mother was a free one-man race in haiti part of the time, but also born in charles and. she started her teaching career in 1916 in a rural school off the coast of charleston. she continued her career in urban schools in south carolina, spent most of her teaching career in south carolina and in 1956 the
is a whistleblower protecting civil rights. but does abc reports, others think he is a powder keg of state secrets. >> the longer he stays underground in china, the fears he make effect handing over a jackpot of secrets. >> every day he is in china erodes his claim he is a missile -- a whistleblower. the information he has is very valuable to the chinese. they are interested in it. if they have not exploited it already, i suspect they soon will be. >> he told a paper that people think that he made a mistake in aching hong kong misunderstand my intentions. i am not here to hide from justice. i am here to reveal criminality. >> i think think he is a traitor. >> vice president dick cheney says he is the enemy. >> one of the worst cases in my memory of someone with access doing enormous damage to the national security interest of united states. >> in hong kong, snowden is being rallied against. >> we demand of the whole truth be by the u.s. administration and we demand a conditional apology. the father of his girlfriend said he never expected these events. >> i can't believe you went this far with thi
civil rights address at a time when civil rights mattered. 50 years later, rights of any kind mean nothing and our society is privatized by the influence of corporate money with very little money and no benefit to the public. these are actual public disclosure documents. when the friends of the library made its original claim that it would raise $16 million for the branch library in 2000, it had assets of 20.3 million. at the end of the most recent year for which we have figures, the friends had net assets of 8.9 million, thus during the 12 years of the branch library improvement program, it had net lost assets of 11.3 million. as required under the san francisco administrative code, the library administration has reported that funds expended to carry out or assist any function in the public library during that period was only 4.9 million. this means that after having income over that same period of $40 million, of which the library got not one red cent, the library received only 43% of the reduction in assets. the library would have been better off, in fact, four times the benefit
francisco would be become my new home. as some of you may know my background is as a civil rights lawyer working right here in san francisco. back then, a generation set out to make sure that we all recognized our greatest asset as a nation, our diversity. and together, in those years, we locked arms and stood in a doorway of the international hotel. to prevent the wrongful eviction of senior chinese and filipino immigrants who had no money and no place to go. [ applause ] and today san francisco has some of the best tenant protections. we sued the san francisco fire department, to get women and people of color a chance to be a firefighter, to serve, the public of san francisco. and to dedicate their lives to public safety, today we have a city's first female fire chief and our public safety agencies are more diverse than ever, and just as proud and good as any other generation that this city has ever seen. i joined with others there that were just as dedicated and committed as i was to make a difference for the residents of san francisco. together, we helped to make san francisco a diff
the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco but statewide. she's here to give us an update on what's happening.
it to them and to intervene to help. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garb
thing i remember about john dingle was in 1925eu6 civil rights revolution. it wasn't just a southern thing. it was very much more than industrial areas and john dingle put at risk his own career by voting for the act in 1965. the "wall street journal" said 50 to 1 chance he won't be re-elected. and he was. >> we'll see you next week.
an achievement. and one thing i remember about john dingle was in 1925eu6 civil rights revolution. it wasn't just a southern thing. it was very much more than industrial areas and john dingle put at risk his own career by voting for the act in 1965. the "wall street journal" said 50 to 1 chance he won't be re-elected. nd he was. >> we'll see you next week. the second time, you're older... hopefully wiser. and you're going into it with your heart, too. open. we've got experience on our side. and kids... and mortgages... and savings... so, we switched to suntrust. they made it easier to fit t to lives, into one. because this is about more than our finances. it's our second chance. switching to suntrust has never been easasier. from direct deposit to online bill pay, our dedicated team will move . >> business news f from the capital region. on this is "washington business report" with abc7 national correspondent rebebecca cooper. >> thanks for joinining us here onon washington. more good news
was a very important person in the civil rights movement. she was also important before that. she was nearly six years old the citizenship education program, it seemed like i'd gone into researching this and the further i got along, i talked about what she had done. what did she do that have prepared her to do this. and what does this tell us about the deeper roots of the movement and the women's roles in it. then there was her schools which had primary site of women's activism. looking at this figure was a way to tell a longer story about the civil rights movement. it also about black women's activism across the 20th century. she was born in charleston in 1898. her father was a slave. her mother was a woman who had been raised in haiti part of the time and also born in charleston. she started her teaching career in 1960 in a rural school. it is a sea island off the coast of charleston. she continued her career in urban schools in south carolina. in 1956, the state of south carolina passed a law for state employees to belonging to subversive organizations and the naacp. she lost her job and
. civil rights groups sued. they said it's intended to suppress the votes of legal immigrants. the state responded by saying that they are trying to reduce voter fraud. supreme court ruled that the federal law is supreme here. congress can change those rules. it gets the last word and, therefore, what air zone has done here goes beyond motor voter and cannot do it. what the supreme court said arizo arizona loses in the short term but could come back and try this again because while the congress gets the last word on how elections are conducted, the supreme court majority said the states get the last word on who is eligible to vote. so this may invite a whole new round of lawsuits about states trying to rein in voter fraud. >> what are the other big cases that the justices will decide before the end of the current session and when? do we know? >> the which i can tell you. the when i can't. we know we'll get decisions next monday. we'll probably get them some other day next week. we're still waiting for the big ones. on same-sex marriage, the prop 8 in california and federal defensive marr
civil rights issue of our time. >> he's talking about that ruling on same sex marriage. and the historic role o the tech industry. bloomberg encouraged students interested in entrepreneurship to move to new york city instead of silicon valley. i wonder how that went over and also spoke about the need for immigration reform. >> about 30% of graurts heduate are on student visas. if those in washington had any sense at all, they would be begging you to stay in the united states. but instead -- [ applause ]. instead, our immigration laws may force some of you to leave in the months and years ahead. >> present the candidates their degrees. >> the mayor also joked the graduates would have a better dating and social life in new york city. that's sort of interesting. >>> coming up next at 6:00, he made a fortune in medical tech and now wants to give back. to inspire innovators of the future. >>> also -- >> changes at this year's san francisco marathon could not slow the races down. the man and woman who won today's race, one of them from the bay area. >>> a children's party rocked by gunfire, to
to the united states senate commending john robert lewis, congressman from the city of atlanta, civil rights leader of the 1960's and 1950's and my personal friend. in 1954 i was fen years old when the atlanta public schools when brown versus the board of education was decided in the united states supreme court. john lewis was four years older than me, born outside of pike county, alabama went to the pike county segregated public schools. he went on to fiske university to get a degree in religion and philosophy and volunteered for sit-ins to break the first sit-in in lunch councilors in nashville. this year marks the 50let anniversary of the big six in civil rights. as i'm sure the president will remember it was 50 years ago this august that martin luther king led a march on washington and gave his speech i have a dream on the lincoln memorial. there were six great civil rights leaders then, only one left, john robert lewis. john is my friend, i'm come patriot and our lives with are parallelled each other all the way through. john introduced me when i was elected to the house of representati
, requiring some kind of document to prove it. civil rights groups said it was trying to make it harder for legal immigrants to vote. forcing them to clear additional hurdles. today with a vote of 7-2 with justices thomas and alito dissenting, the court said what arizona did was inconsistent with the motor voter laws to use that federal form. the constitution the court said gives congress the final word on how federal elections are conducted. still unresolved how much power the state has to say on who gets to vote. today's ruling likely dooms similar laws in georgia, alabama, and kansas. we'll get decisions again on thursday, brian, with big cases of this term still to come. >> all right, pete williams covering at the court for us tonight. pete, thanks. >>> out west, this has already been a terrible fire season. there were predictions today it could still get a lot worse. firefighters continue to fight a big burn in northern california that forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes, while the l.a. county fire department said today this should shape up to be the worst fire season in 100
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 339 (some duplicates have been removed)